DeSantis and Crist Debate Claims Facts Checked: Florida Governor Debate

Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis and Democrat Charlie Crist could both claim victory in Monday night’s heated debate. At the start of the debate, DeSantis defended the reopening of schools in the fall of the first year of the pandemic by pointing to the new national report card on schools from the National Assessment of Education Progress from the National Center for Education Statistics. . “Florida is No. 3 in fourth-grade reading and No. 4 in the nation in fourth-grade math,” DeSantis said. The governor’s statement on Florida’s ranking is a fact, but it leaves out vital information. .” According to the National Report Card, for reading in eighth grade, Florida students’ average score in 2022 was lower than their average score in 2019. Reading scores remained the same. The bottom line is that the COVID pandemic -19 hurt education Florida fared better Much of the debate centered on Florida’s sharp rift over abortion rights, with Crist promising to sign an executive order executive, if elected, to protect women’s access.” He supports dismemberment abortions where they literally rip the baby limb from limb. . And he supports taxpayer-funded abortion right up to the moment of birth, and that’s wrong,” DeSantis said. This claim is largely false. The claim refers to the Women’s Health Protection Act which was passed along party lines after Roe v. Wade. Crist voted with the majority on the measure that would technically make abortion legal until birth. The Washington Post pointed out that this is more of a political reality than a practical one since only 5.5% of abortions take place after 15 weeks and 1.3% are performed at 21 weeks or later. The two argued over who has done the most to reduce crime. under Governor DeSantis. Crime was down when I was your governor,” Crist said. “Because we enforced the laws and made sure Floridians were safe.” He should have cut that statement in half. To say that crime is on the rise under Governor DeSantis is wrong. According to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement’s Uniform Crime Report, in the first two years of DeSantis’ tenure, crime dropped 14%, although it should be noted that violent crime increased by 2.3. %. The second part of Crist’s claim that crime dropped when he was governor is a fact. According to FBI crime statistics, violent crimes in particular rose from about 131,000 in his first year in office to 101,000 in his last year. Several times during the debate, Crist asked DeSantis to pledge to serve for four years if elected and not running for president. DeSantis never gave an answer. That’s a fact. Which candidate approved the largest tax increase in Florida history and who is to blame for Florida’s property insurance crisis? During the opening minutes of the debate, Crist and DeSantis were asked about the how they would tackle rising insurance rates with images of Hurricane Ian and its catastrophic damage fresh in their minds. “I want to make Florida more affordable again. When I was governor, I lowered your property insurance,” Crist said. This statement is largely true. Crist made insurance a key part of his gubernatorial campaign, and in a 2007 special session lawmakers passed a bill that allowed insurance companies to buy Florida Hurricane Risk Reinsurance at cheaper rates. A staff analysis estimated that rates would fall by 10% to 15%. However, Crist received plenty of help, with no major storms when he was governor. So what about DeSantis? “He’s talking about property insurance and everyone watching tonight knows your property insurance is in place under him,” Crist said. This statement is a fact, but it requires a lot of context. Five years before Hurricane Ian hit Florida, Irma and Maria wreaked havoc in the Sunshine State the year before DeSantis was elected, leading to massive and often fraudulent compensation claims. According to the Insurance Information Institute, “Florida leads the nation in homeowners insurance disputes, despite accounting for less than 10% of claims.” what it was like when DeSantis took office. “When Charlie Crist was governor, he showed up saying he wouldn’t raise taxes. He became governor and he approved the largest tax and fee increases in the history of the state of Florida,” DeSantis said. This statement by DeSantis is a fact. After Crist weathered the worst of the recession, in 2009 he signed a $2.2 billion increase in taxes and fees on things like renewing tobacco and car license tags, as well as the increase in the amount of business. had to pay workers’ insurance. At one point, DeSantis slammed Crist for showing up in Washington, DC, just 14 days this year. Granted, Crist has voted mostly by proxy during the pandemic, but he’s only missed 2% of his votes during his career, according to GovTrack, which is the congressional average.

Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis and Democrat Charlie Crist could both claim victory in Monday night’s heated debate.

At the start of the debate, DeSantis defended the reopening of schools in the fall of the first year of the pandemic by pointing to the new National Report Card on Schools from the National Assessment of Education Progress from the National Center for Education Statistics. ‘education.

“Florida is No. 3 in fourth-grade reading and No. 4 in the nation in fourth-grade math,” DeSantis said.

The governor’s statement on Florida’s ranking is a fact, but it omits vital information.

Just look at the national report card headlines, such as “lower eighth grade math scores in 51 states” and “lower fourth grade math scores in 43 states.”

According to the national report card, for reading in eighth grade, Florida students’ average score in 2022 was lower than their average score in 2019.

In fact, Florida’s eighth- and fourth-grade math scores also dropped, and fourth-grade reading scores stayed the same. The bottom line is that the COVID-19 pandemic has harmed education. Florida is doing better.

“I want to make sure that we keep the right to choose of a wife available to women in the state of Florida,” Crist said.

Much of the debate has focused on Florida’s sharp divide over abortion rights, with Crist promising to sign an executive order, if elected, to protect women’s access.

“He supports dismemberment abortions where they literally tear the baby limb by limb. And he supports taxpayer-funded abortion right up to the moment of birth, and that’s wrong,” DeSantis said.

This claim is largely false. The claim refers to the Women’s Health Protection Act which was passed along party lines after Roe v. Wade.

Crist voted with the majority on the measure that would technically make abortion legal until birth. The Washington Post pointed out that this is more of a political reality than a practical one since only 5.5% of abortions take place after 15 weeks and 1.3% are performed at 21 weeks or later.

The two argued over who has done the most to reduce crime.

“Crime is on the rise under Governor DeSantis. Crime was down when I was your governor,” Crist said. “Because we enforced the laws and made sure Floridians were safe.”

He should have cut that statement in half. To say that crime is on the rise under Governor DeSantis is wrong.

According to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement’s Uniform Crime Report, in the first two years of DeSantis’ tenure, crime dropped 14%, although it should be noted that violent crime rose 2.3%. %.

The second part of Crist’s claim that crime dropped when he was governor is a fact.

According to FBI crime statistics, violent crimes in particular rose from about 131,000 in his first year in office to 101,000 in his last year.

Several times during the debate, Crist asked DeSantis to pledge to serve four years if elected and not running for president. DeSantis never gave an answer. That’s a fact.

Which candidate approved the largest tax increase in Florida history, and who is responsible for Florida’s property insurance crisis?

During the opening minutes of the debate, Crist and DeSantis were asked how they would tackle rising insurance rates with images of Hurricane Ian and its catastrophic damage fresh in their minds.

“I want to make Florida more affordable again. When I was governor, I lowered your property insurance,” Crist said.

This statement is largely true.

Crist made insurance a key part of his gubernatorial campaign, and in a 2007 special session, lawmakers passed a bill allowing insurance companies to buy Florida Hurricane Risk Reinsurance from cheaper rates. A staff analysis estimates that rates would fall by 10% to 15%.

Crist received plenty of help though, with no major storms when he was governor. How about DeSantis?

“He’s talking about property insurance and everyone watching tonight knows your property insurance is in place under him,” Crist said.

This statement is a fact, but it requires a lot of context.

Five years before Hurricane Ian hit Florida, Irma and Maria wreaked havoc in the Sunshine State the year before DeSantis was elected, leading to massive, often fraudulent, compensation claims.

According to the Insurance Information Institute, “Florida leads the nation in homeowners insurance disputes, despite accounting for less than 10% of claims.”

The result: Florida’s average annual bonus is now $4,100, up from a national average of $1,600 and about double what it was when DeSantis took office.

“When Charlie Crist was governor, he came forward saying he wouldn’t raise taxes. He became governor and he approved the largest tax and fee increases in the history of the state of Florida,” DeSantis said.

This statement by DeSantis is a fact.

After Crist weathered the worst of the recession, in 2009 he approved a $2.2 billion increase in taxes and fees on things like renewing tobacco and car license tags, as well as increasing the amount of money companies had to pay for workers’ insurance.

At one point, DeSantis slammed Crist for showing up in Washington, DC, just 14 days this year. Granted, Crist has voted mostly by proxy during the pandemic, but he’s only missed 2% of his votes during his career, according to GovTrack, which is the congressional average.

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